<
You are here : HOME > NEWS >

Port Sud: achitectural winner announced

Space, light and glass feature in the winning design
[+] Space, light and glass feature in the winning design

[+] Port Sud project -image (c) Bodgan & Van Broek Architects

[+] Port Sud project -image (c) Bodgan & Van Broek Architects

[+] Port Sud project-image (c) Bodgan & Van Broek Architects

[+] Port Sud project-image - Historical view of the Moulart building

A year ago, Brussels Environment minister Evelyne Huytebroeck announced the ‘Port Sud’ project on the canal banks in Anderlecht, a renovation of the former Meunières building. This morning, in conjunction with Fabrice Cumps, President of the Anderlecht Moulart company and the Anderlecht commune civil servant in charge of this project, she introduced the winning architectural bureau, Bogdan & Vanbroeck Architects. Leo Van Broeck and his partner Oana Bogdan presented their designs.

Before they did, Fabrice Cumps explained that 25 projects had been received following the call for tenders, for a project which is set to create a centre to accommodate SME’s and an interpretation centre on an area of some 3,000 m², creating employment. Evelyne Huytebroeck spoke of this part of Anderlecht being a difficult zone but praised the successful public-private and ‘public-public’ partnerships which had enabled this ambitious project to get off the ground. She recalled that Port Sud is not an isolated project, but forms part of a much wider rehabilitation of a large tract of the canal-sides in Brussels. She spoke of the project helping in Brussels’ quest to create jobs, but also of it being both a renovation operation for a symbolic building (of which there are many along the canal, she said), and a further step in the efforts to improve the attractiveness of this part of the town.

Leo Van Broeck showed a project which linked the front and rear buildings, retaining certain architectural features at floor level (the ‘archaeology’ of the building as he called it) and also retaining echos of the past in the facades. The idea, he explained, was not to make people choose between the past and the present, but to have both available to the eye. The design features a number of entrance points, all leading to a central reception area. An open public area would be created on the roof, along with a roof garden. Another feature is the use of glass to reflect the canal, so that boats can be seen going by even if the observer is several metres to the interior of the building. Energy recuperation and sustainable development are also part of the technical specification.
Tim Harrup
13-02-2012


News in short
Co-working space a global phenomenon | 15/11
Major logistics transaction at Willebroek | 13/11
Alibaba confirms Liège hub | 13/11
Brussels office market in phase-change | 12/11
Brussels Law courts get new lease of life | 7/11
Cording moves into Luxembourg | 6/11
Copernicus adds to 'human' European district | 5/11
Courbevoie finally underway | 30/10
SEGRO leaves Belgium | 29/10
Eaglestone buys Woluwe Atrium | 26/10
Wallonia proposes new planning guidelines | 24/10
HIB acquires leisure park on the coast | 23/10
ULI looks at North District and urban future | 18/10
Mapic ponders digital era | 17/10
50-year old INGENIUM reviews role | 17/10